Question

When on the job market, do you always counter when made an offer? Or do you accept if you know the offer is fair?

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13 Responses to Question

  1. Krissy says:

    Accept a fair offer. Countering could be the loss of the oppurtunity.

  2. ames says:

    Ask if its a firm offer, then counter. Definitely negotiate terms like bonuses, health, vacation, flex time, gas/mileage stipend. If they can’t move on pay the perks could get the desired number.

    My husband negotiated all of his salaries.

  3. CreolePeach says:

    I’ve almost always countered. I also always pad salaries to prevent them offering too low of a number. More often than not, what they offer you is on their lower end. I’ve always been told by HR people they expect people to negotiate. All they’ll do is come back and say whether they can or cannot budge.

  4. AR Gal says:

    I always counter.

  5. GeckoGirl says:

    I always counter. The worse they can do is say no. I’ve never heard of an offer being rescinded because someone dared to ask for more. Note that very few women counter as compared to men. I believe this is part of the reason there’s a wage disparity between the genders.

  6. Barista says:

    I used to accept if it seemed fair until I realized I was pretty much the only one doing it. Now I always counter.

  7. keyalus says:

    I’ve always received offers that were what I was looking for so I haven’t countered. I’m not really a negotiator though so asking for more just because isn’t something I would be comfortable with.

    I did negotiate a benefit at my most recent position though. They didn’t offer full health insurance coverage for 90 days. We agreed that they would purchase a short-term policy for me until company benefits kicked in.

    • Krissy says:

      Maybe this is the reason I never had countered either. The offers have always been fair.

      My next position however, I may have to play hard ball.

  8. Disco Diva says:

    Outside the company I am working for, I always try to negotiote something on the benefits if the salary is fair. Internally since I know “more” about what is fair, tend to not counter.

  9. GeckoGirl says:

    I’m somewhat surprised to see so many people mentioning fair. Sure, $XX may be a reasonable salary but why settle for that if they were willing to pay you $YY? Not to mention, that extra $5K or $10K can make your salary increase exponentially over the years due to raises.

  10. Dark&Lovely says:

    Being in the recruiting industry for 5+ years I’ve learned that its always smart to negoiate. In the company I work for, most of the time hiring managers determine the salary (not recruiters) and its based on the level, and how much the client/contract will allow and they almost always (like, 70% of the time) offer on the low end of the range to get you for as cheap as they can. Although, the higher in deamand you are, they know not to play around. Negoiate with confidence and not arrogance or in a way that you’re making demands. I think that’s what keeps some people from countering because they don’t want to come off rude, demanding or ungrateful. Countering is as simple as just asking and if companies can budge a little, more times than not they will, especially if they really want you.

  11. busybodyk says:

    I always negotiate for a little more than offered especially if the perks aren’t what I’m used to. I will say that I work from home once a week currently or have more vacation now and then I keep negotiating until they say no. They don’t want to feel bulldozed but once a manager and/or recruiter wants you, they want to do whatever they can to keep you so they don’t have to start over.

  12. I always counter and when I do, I make sure I do a salary survey of comparable positions in my area from Salary.com or some other source. And another thing, if you can’t get more salary money you might try seeing if they will give some more vacation days, or perhaps a sign-on bonus.

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